Tag Archive: academic life

Jan 01

Review of 2017

Happy New Year

2017 has come and gone. 2018 eagerly awaits getting acquainted. But first we look back one last time, trying to turn this into a old tradition. What have I done during the last year of some academic merit.

Publications: +4

Completed refereeing tasks: +8

  • The Journal of Physical Chemistry (2x)
  • Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (3x)
  • Diamond and Related Materials (3x)

Conferences & workshops: +5 (Attended) 

  • Int. Conference on Diamond and Carbon Materials (DCM) 2017, Gothenburg, Sweden, September 3rd-7th, 2017 [oral presentation]
  • Summerschool: “Upscaling techniques for mathematical models involving multiple scales”, Hasselt, Belgium, June 26th-29th, 2017 [poster presentation]
  • VSC-user day, Brussels, Belgium, June 2nd, 2017 [poster presentation]
  • E-MRS 2017 Spring Meeting, Strasbourg, France, May 22nd-26th, 2017 [1 oral + 2 poster presentations]
  • SBDD XXII, Hasselt University, Belgium, March 8th-10th, 2017 [poster presentation]

PhD-students: +1

  • Mohammadreza Hosseini (okt.-… ,Phd student physical chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, Teheran, Iran)

Bachelor-students: +2

Current size of HIVE:

  • 48.5K lines of program (code: 70 %)
  • ~70 files
  • 45 (command line) options

Hive-STM program:

And now, upward and onward, a new year, a fresh start.

Jun 16

Functional Molecular Modelling: simulating particles in excel

This semester I had several teaching assignments. I was a TA for the course biophysics for the first bachelor biomedical sciences, supervised two 3rd bachelor students physics during their first steps in the realm of computational materials science, and finally, I was responsible for half the course Functional Molecular Modelling for the first Masters Biomedical students (Bioelectronics and Nanotechnology). In this course, I introduce the the students into the basic concepts of classical molecular modelling (quantum modelling is covered by Prof. Wilfried Langenaeker). It starts with a reiteration of some basic concepts from statistics and moves on to cover the canonical ensemble. Things get more interesting with the introduction into Monte-Carlo(MC) and Molecular Dynamics(MD), where I hope to teach the students the basics needed to perform their own MC and MD simulations. This also touches the heart of what this course should cover. If I hear a title like Functional Molecular Modelling, my thoughts move directly to practical applications, developing and implementing models, and performing simulations. This becomes a bit difficult as none of the students have any programming experience or skills.

Luckily there is excel. As the basic algorithms for MC and MD are actually quite simple, this office package can be (ab)used to allow the students to perform very simple simulations. This even without the use of macro’s or any advanced features. Because Excel can also plot the data present in the cells, you immediately see how properties of the simulated system vary during the simulation, and you get direct update of all graphs every time a simulation is run.

It seems I am not the only one who is using excel for MD simulations. In 1995, Fraser and Woodcock even published a paper detailing the use of excel for performing MD simulations on a system of 100 particles. Their MD is a bit more advanced than the setup I used as it made heavy use of macro’s and needed some features to speed things up as much as possible. With the x486 66MHz computers available at that time, the simulations took of the order of hours. Which was impressive, as they served as an example of how computational speed had improved over the years, and compared to the months of supercomputer resources one of the authors had needed 25 years earlier to perform the same thing for his PhD. Nowadays the same excel simulation should only take minutes, while an actual program in Fortran or C may even execute the same thing in a matter of seconds or less.

For the classes and exercises, I made use of a simple 3-atom toy-model with Lennard-Jones interactions. The resulting simulations remain clear allowing their use for educational purposes. In case of  MC simulations, a nice added bonus is the fact that excel updates all its fields automatically when a cell is modified. As a result, all random numbers are regenerated and a new simulation can be performed by saving the excel-sheet or just modifying a not-used cell.

Monte Carlo in excel. A system of three particles on a line, with one particle fixed at 0. All particles interact through a Lennard-Jones potential. The Monte Carlo simulation shows how the particles move toward their equilibrium position.

Monte Carlo in excel. A system of three particles on a line, with one particle fixed at 0. All particles interact through a Lennard-Jones potential. The Monte Carlo simulation shows how the particles move toward their equilibrium position.

The simplicity of Newton’s equations of motion make it possible to perform simple MD simulations, and already for a three particle system, you can see how unstable the algorithm is. Implementation of the leap-frog algorithm isn’t much more complex and shows incredible the stability of this algorithm. In the plot of the total energy you can even see how the algorithm fights back to retain stability (the spikes may seem large, but the same setup with a straight forward implementation of Newton’s equation of motion quickly moves to energies of the order of 100).

Molecular dynamics in excel. A system of three particles on a line, with one particle fixed at 0. All particles interact through a Lennard-Jones potential. The Molecular dynamics simulation shows how the particles move as time evolves. Their positions are updated using the leap-frog algorithm. The extreme hard nature of the Lennard-Jones potential gives rise to the sharp spikes in the total energy. It is this last aspect which causes the straight forward implementation of Newton's equations of motion to fail.

Molecular dynamics in excel. A system of three particles on a line, with one particle fixed at 0. All particles interact through a Lennard-Jones potential. The Molecular dynamics simulation shows how the particles move as time evolves. Their positions are updated using the leap-frog algorithm. The extreme hard nature of the Lennard-Jones potential gives rise to the sharp spikes in the total energy. It is this last aspect which causes the straight forward implementation of Newton’s equations of motion to fail.

 

Dec 26

Scaling of VASP 5.4.1 on TIER-1b BrENIAC

When running programs on HPC infrastructure, one of the first questions to ask yourself is: “How well does this program scale?

In applications for HPC resources, this question plays a central role, often with the additional remark: “But for your specific system!“. For some software packages this is an important remark, for other packages this remark has little relevance, as the package performs similarly for all input (or for given classes of input). The VASP package is one of the latter. For my current resource application at the Flemish TIER-1 I set out to do a more extensive scaling test of the VASP package. This is for 2 reasons. The first being the fact that I will be using a newer version of VASP: vasp 5.4.1 (I am currently using my own multiply patched version 5.3.3.). The second being the fact that I will be using a brand new TIER-1 machine (second Flemish TIER-1, as our beloved muk retired the end of 2016).

Why should I put in the effort to get access to resources on such a TIER-1 supercomputer? Because such machines are the life blood of the computational materials scientist. They are their sidekick in the quest for understanding of materials. Over the past 4 years, I was granted (and used) 20900 node-days of calculation time (i.e. over 8 Million hours of CPU time, or 916 years of calculation time) on the first TIER-1 machine.

Now back to the topic. How well does VASP 5.4.1 behave? That depends on the system at hand, and how good you choose the parallelization settings.

1. Parallelization in VASP

VASP provides several parameters which allow for straightforward parallelization of the simulation:

  • NPAR : This parameter can be set to parallelize over the electronic bands. As a consequence, the number of bands included in a calculation by VASP will be a multiple of NPAR. (Note : Hybrid calculations are an exception as they require NPAR to be set to the number of cores used per k-point.)
  • NCORE : The NCORE parameter is related to NPAR via NCORE=#cores/NPAR, so only one of these can be set.
  • KPAR : This parameter can be set to parallelize over the set of irreducible k-points used to integrate over the first Brillouin zone. KPAR should therefore best be a divisor of the number of irreducible k-points.
  • LPLANE : This boolean parameter allows one to switch on parallelization over plane waves. In general this will give rise to a small but consistent speedup (observed in previous scaling tests). As such we have chosen to set this parameter = .TRUE. for all calculations.
  • NSIM : Sets up a blocked mode for the RMM-DIIS algorithm. (cf. manual, and further tests by Peter Larsson). As our tests do not involve the RMM-DIIS algorithm, this parameter was not set.

In addition, one needs to keep the architecture of the HPC-system in mind as well: NPAR, KPAR and their product should be divisors of the number of nodes (and cores) used.

2. Results

Both NPAR and KPAR parameters can be set simultaneously and will have a serious influence on the speed of your calculations. However, not all possible combinations give the same speedup. Even worse, not all combinations are beneficial with regard to speed. This is best seen for a small 2 atom diamond primitive cell.

Timing primitive uni cell diamond.

Timing results for various combinations of the NPAR and KPAR parameters for a 2 atom primitive unit cell of diamond.

Two things are clear. First of all, switching on a parallelization parameter does not necessarily mean the calculation will speed up. In some case it may actually slow you down. Secondly, the best and worst performance is consistently obtained using the same settings. Best: KPAR = maximal, and NPAR = 1, worst: KPAR = 1 and NPAR = maximal.

This small system shows us what you can expect for systems with a lot of k-points and very few electronic bands ( actually, any real calculation on this system would only require 8 electronic bands, not 56 as was used here to be able to asses the performance of the NPAR parameter.)

In a medium sized system (20-100 atoms), the situation will be different. There, the number of k-points will be small (5-50) while the natural number of electronic bands will be large (>100). As a test-case I looked at my favorite Metal-Organic Framework: MIL-47(V).

scaling of MIL-47(V) at PBE level

Timing results for several NPAR/KPAR combinations for the MIL-47(V) system.

This system has only 12 k-points to parallelize over, and 224 electronic bands. The spread per number of nodes is more limited than for the small system. In contrast, the general trend remains the same: KPAR=high, NPAR=low, with an optimum performance when KPAR=#nodes. Going beyond standard DFT, using hybrid functionals, also retains the same picture, although in some cases about 10% performance can be gained when using one half node per k-point. Unfortunatly, as we have very few k-points to start from, this will only be an advantage if the limiting factor is the number of nodes available.

An interesting behaviour is seen when one keeps the k-points/#nodes ratio constant:

scaling at constant k-point/node ratio

Scaling behavior for either a constant number of k-points (for dense k-point grid in medium sized system) or constant k-point/#nodes ratio.

As you can see, VASP performs really well up to KPAR=#k-points (>80% efficiency). More interestingly, if the k-point/#node ratio is kept constant, the efficiency (now calculated as T1/(T2*NPAR) with T1 timing for a single node, and T2 for multiple nodes) is roughly constant. I.e. if you know the walltime for a 2-k-point/2-nodes job, you can use/expect the same for the same system but now considering 20-k-points/20-nodes (think Density of States and Band-structure calculations, or just change of #k-points due to symmetry reduction or change in k-point grid.)  😆

3. Conclusions and Guidelines

If one thing is clear from the current set of tests, it is the fact that good scaling is possible. How it is attained, however, depends greatly on the system at hand. More importantly, making a poor choice of parallelization settings can be very detrimental to the obtained speed-up and efficiency. Unfortunately when performing calculations on an HPC system, one has externally imposed limitations to work with:

  • Memory available per core
  • Number of cores per node[1]
  • Size of your system: #atoms, #k-points, & #bands

Here are some guidelines (some open doors as well):

  • Wherever possible k-point parallelization should be driven to a maximum (KPAR as large as possible). The limiting factor here is the actual number of k-points and the amount of memory available. The latter due to the fact that a higher value of KPAR leads to a higher memory requirement.[2]
  • Use the Γ-version of VASP for Γ-point only calculations. It reduces memory usage significantly (3.7Gb→ 2.8Gb/core for a 512 atom diamond system) and increases the computational efficiency, sometimes even by a factor of 2.
  • NPAR parallelization can be used to reduce the memory load for high KPAR calculations, but increasing KPAR will always outperform the same increase of NPAR.
  • In case only NPAR parallelization is available, due to too few k-points, and working with large systems, NPAR parallelization is your last resort, and will perform reasonably well, up to a point.
  • Electronic steps show very consistent timing, so scaling tests can be performed with only a 5-10 electronic steps, with standard deviations comparable in absolute size for PBE and HSE06.

 

In short:

K-point parallelism will save you, wherever possible !

 

[1] 28 is a lousy number in that regard as its prime-decomposition is 2x2x7, leaving little overlap with prime-decompositions of the number of k-points, which more often than you wish end up being prime numbers themselves 😥
[2] The small system’s memory requirements varied from 0.15 to 1.09 Gb/core for the different combinations.

Oct 18

BrENIAC: the new Flemish TIER-1 Supercomputer.

breniacYesterday was a good day for computational scientists in Flanders. The new TIER-1 machine, named BrENIAC, located at the university of Leuven, was inaugurated and is now officially open to all users of the Flemish university associations: UAntwerpen, VUB, UGhent, UHasselt, and KULeuven. The name refers to one of the first (super)computers ever built: ENIAC. This new machine will take over the task of the first TIER-1 machine (muk, located at the university of Ghent), which will be decommissioned at the end of this year. BrENIAC is ranked 196th in the current top 500 of supercomputers, and costs 5.5 M€. This is of course without the annual cost of power usage and technical personnel which will maintain the machine and provide support for the scientists running calculations. With its 580 compute nodes, containing 28 cores each (or 2 14-core CPU’s of the type Broadwell E5-2680v4), the number of available cores has roughly doubled. Also memory access should have improved, which gives rise to a theoretical threefold increase of the peak performance.

However, this peak performance is measured with “benchmark” tests, which tend to behave much better than real  life programs. This is because the average scientific programmer doesn’t write the best optimized code (ok, “commercial” programs these days may even behave worse :p )  for various reasons, time constraints being one of them. So my first task, before I start running my simulations on the new TIER-1 machine, will be to benchmark VASP and my own HIVE-code.

Two videos of my new sidekick:

 

You can see me in my front-row position in this picture taken during the non-academic part of the inauguration.

Oct 06

tUL Life Sciences Research Day 2016

Yesterday was the tUL Life Sciences Research Day 2016. A conference event build around finding collaboration possibilities between the University of Hasselt in Belgium and the University of Maastricht (The Netherlands)…after all tUL is the “transnational University Limburg” which brings two universities together that are only separated some 26 km, but you have to cross a national border.

Although Life sciences itself is not my personal niche, I went to look for opportunities, as nano-particles which are used for drug delivery often consist of metals or oxides. These materials on the other hand are my niche. I used my current work on MOFs as a means to show what is possible from the ab-initio point of view, and presented this as a poster.

tUL Life Science Research Day 2016 Poster

Poster presented at the tUL Life Sciences Research Day, depicting my work on the unfunctionalized and the functionalized MIL-47(V) MOF.

Aug 31

Holiday-Conference roller coaster

Visit to Stockholm. The knight at the Medeltidsmuseet (top left), brown bear in Skansen (top right), visiting the Royal palace (bottom left) and local entertainment in the old city center (bottom right).

Visit to Stockholm. The knight at the Medeltidsmuseet (top left), brown bear in Skansen (top right), visiting the Royal palace (bottom left) and local entertainment in the old city center (bottom right).

Summertime is a time of rest for most people. For our little academic family, last summer was a bit of a roller coaster; alternating holidays with hard work which had been postponed too much. The last vestige of my start of a new chapter (moving the remaining stuff from the apartment to our house) was finally bested. Now the conference roller coaster has started with Sylvia’s plenary lecture on conceptual spaces in Stockholm.

As neither of us ever visited Sweden before, we decided to turn it into a semi-family-holiday as well. Our 4-year-old son enjoyed his first ever plane flight (he wasn’t really convinced something impressive was going on). And while Sylvia was of to the conference, the two of us went to explore Stockholm: Finding the knight in the Medeltidsmuseet (at the left in the back of this beautiful museum 🙂 ) and searching for the king and queen at their palace (they weren’t there 🙁 ). Or visiting one of the oldest open-air musea; Skansen (similar to Bokrijk in Belgium) where we saw old professions at work (making cheese for example) and native Scandinavian farm and wild animals (from peacocks to brown bears).

Next weekend starts the next episode of the conference roller-coaster with me hosting a 2-day colloquium on porous frameworks together with Bartek Szyja and Ionut Tranca at the CMD-26 conference in Groningen. We have a nicely packed colloquium with about 20 presentations (8 invited and 12 contributed) covering the whole realm of porous materials from zeolites to COFs and MOFs. The program of the colloquium can be downloaded below:Program Porous Frameworks Colloquium

May 22

Annual Meeting of the Belgian Physical Society 2016

ConferenceLogoWebsite_1

Wednesday May 18th was a good day for our little family. Since my girlfriend an I both are physicists by training, we attended the annual meeting of the Belgian Physical Society in Ghent, together. What made this event even more special was the fact that both of us had an oral presentation at the same conference, which never happened before. 🙂

Sylvia talked about an example of indeterminism in Newtonian mechanics, and showed how the indeterminism can be clarified by using non-standard analysis. The example considers the Norton Dome, a hill with a specifically designed shape ( y(x)=-2/3(1-(1-3/2|x|)^{2/3})^{3/2} ). When considering a point mass, experiencing only gravitational force, there are two solutions for the equation of motion: (1) the mass is there, and remains there forever (r(t)=0) and (2) the mass was rolling uphill with a non-zero speed which becomes exactly zero at the top, and continues over the top (  r(t)=\frac{1}{144} (t-T)^4 with T the time the top is reached). Here, r refers to the arc length as measured along the dome (0 at the top). In addition, there also exists a family of solutions taking the first solution at t<T, while taking the second solution at t>T. (As the first and second derivatives of these latter solutions are continuous, Newton will not complain.) This leads to indeterminism in a Newtonian system; for instance, you start with a mass on the top of the hill, and at a random point in time it starts to roll off without the presence of an external something putting it into motion. Using infinitesimals, Sylvia shows that the probability for the mass to start rolling off the dome immediately is infinitesimally close to one.

My own talk was on the use of computational materials science as a means for understanding and explaining experimental observations. I presented results on the pressure-induced breathing of the MIL-47(V) MOF, showing how the experimentally observed S-shape of the transition-pressure-curve can be explained by the spin interactions of the unpaired vanadium-d electrons: it turns out that regions with only ferromagnetic chains compress already at 85 MPa, while the addition of higher and higher percentages of anti-ferromagnetic chains increases the pressure at which the pores collapse, up to 125 MPa for the regions containing 100% anti-ferromagnetic chains. As a second topic, I showed how the electronic band structure of the linker-functionalized UiO-66(Zr) MOF changes. When one or two -OH or -SH groups are added to the benzene ring of the linker, part of the valence band is split off and moves into the band gap. In semiconductors, this would be called a gap state; however, in this case, since every linker in the material contributes

Belgian Physical Society Meeting 2016

Top left: I am presenting computational results on MOFs. Top Right: Sylvia presents the Norton Dome. Bottom: Group picture at the central garden in “Het Pand”. (Photos: courtesy of Sylvia Wenmackers (TL), Philippe Smet (TR), and Michael Tytgat (B) )

a single electron state to this gap state, it practically becomes the valence band top. As a consequence, the color of such functionalized MOF’s changes from white to yellow and orange. As a third topic, I discussed the COK-69(Ti) MOF. In this MOF the electrons in the titaniumoxide clusters are strongly correlated, just as for pure titaniumoxide. Because such systems are poorly described with standard DFT, we used the DFT+U approach, which allowed us to discern between Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions. The latter was practically done by partitioning the electron density using the Hirshfeld-I scheme.

Next to our own talks, the BPS-meeting started with two very interesting plenary lectures on the two big machines/facilities of the physics community: ITER (fusion reactor under construction) and LHC (circular collider, under constant upgrade) at CERN. Prof. Jean Jacquinot, presented the progress in fusion research (among which simulations of plasma-instabilities) and the actual building progress of the ITER facility. Prof. Sergio Bertolucci on the other hand informed us on the latest results obtained with the LHC at CERN, but also about future plans (Future Circular Collider, with a circumference of about 100 km!!). He also showed us the amount of data involved in running the CERN experiments, puting them into perspective: LHC produced in 2012 about 15 Petabyte of data per year (15.000 Terabyte) which is the same as the mount of data added to Youtube on yearly basis. At that time the ATLAS experiment had a dataset of 140 Petabyte (compare to the 100 Petabyte of google’s search index or the 180 Petabyte of facebook uploads/year). The presenters, both excellent and enthusiastic speakers, reminded us that these projects thrive on the enthusiasm of young researchers with open minds. But they also noted, something that is rather often forgotten, that it is the journey not the goal which is most important. Of course, ITER is the next step on the road to commercial fusion power, but along the way much more is learned as a result of tackling practical problems. This is even more so for the CERN experiments, where the “goal” is not as related to our daily lives (keeping the lights on) but focuses on understanding the world. This is at the core of what it means to be a physicist: the need and drive to understand the world. This is also what should drive research but becomes increasingly hampered by the funding-question: how/what profit will it make in the “real world”. Remember the transistor which makes your computer and smartphone as powerful as they are, the laser in CD/DVD-players, the internet allowing you to read this post, and so many more.

Following these plenary presentations, four young scientists competed for the young speaker award presenting their PhD research. Two presentations (1),(2) focused on vortices in superconductors, a third one discussed the use of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons to enhance telecommunication while the fourth talk introduced us into the world of string theory.

In the afternoon, there were six parallel session, of which I mainly attended the Condensed Matter and Nanostructure Physics-session (since I had my own talk there) and the Biological, Medical, Statistical and Mathematical Physics-session rooting for Sylvia. During the Condensed matter session I was mainly fascinated by the presentation of Prof. Sara Bals, on coloring atoms in 3 dimensions. She showed how, using energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping it is possible to create a 3D atomic lattice of nano-materials and clusters. This is a more direct approach than the usual X-ray diffraction (XRD) approach for identifying a crystal structure. Unfortunately, I am afraid this technique may not be well suited for the MOFs I’m working on, since they contain mainly light elements and not heavy metals(although it may be interesting to try once the technique is optimized further). It is, however, definitely a technique to remember for future projects, to suggest to experimental collaborators.

Links:

Apr 12

Call for Abstracts: Condensed Matter Science in Porous Frameworks: On Zeolites, Metal- and Covalent-Organic Frameworks

Flyer for the Colloquium on Porous Frameworks at the CMD26Together with Ionut Tranca (TU Eindhoven, The Netherlands) and Bartłomiej Szyja (Wrocław University of Technology, Poland) I am organizing a colloquium “Condensed Matter Science in Porous Frameworks: On Zeolites, Metal- and Covalent-Organic Frameworks” which will take place during the 26th biannual Conference & Exhibition CMD26 – Condensed Matter in Groningen (September 4th – 9th, 2016). During our colloquium, we hope to bring together experimental and theoretical researchers working in the field of porous frameworks, providing them the opportunity to present and discuss their latest work and discoveries.

Zeolites, Metal-Organic Frameworks, and Covalent-Organic Frameworks are an interesting class of hybrid materials. They are situated at the boundary of research fields, with properties akin to both molecules and solids. In addition, their porosity puts them at the boundary between surfaces and bulk materials, while their modular nature provides a wealthy playground for materials design.

We invite you to submit your abstract for oral or poster contributions to our colloquium. Poster contributions participate in a Best Poster Prize competition.

The deadline for abstract submission is April 30th, 2016.

The extended deadline for abstract submission is May 14th, 2016.

 

CMD26 – Condensed Matter in Groningen is an international conference, organized by the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society, covering all aspects of condensed matter physics, including soft condensed matter, biophysics, materials science, quantum physics and quantum simulators, low temperature physics, quantum fluids, strongly correlated materials, semiconductor physics, magnetism, surface and interface physics, electronic, optical and structural properties of materials. The scientific programme will consist of a series of plenary and semi-plenary talks and Mini-colloquia. Within each Mini-colloquium, there will be invited lectures, oral contributions and posters.

 

Feel free to distribute this call for abstracts and our flyer and we hope to see you in Groningen!

Mar 09

SBDD XXI

SBDD XXI logoToday was the first day of the three-day long diamond conference at the university of Hasselt. And although this sounds as-if it is a mere small-scale local conference, it is actually one of the two main international conferences in the field. The Surface and Bulk Defects in Diamond (SBDD) workshop grew in twenty years from a small event with only a few dozen participants to the current event with over 200 participants. As such, it is the place to be, for one as me, who is dipping into a new field of materials.

One thing that already became quite clear today, is the fact that there are many opportunities in this field for the computational materials scientist, as the large majority of the researchers are experimentalists. Of the >120 posters presented, I have only discovered about 5 theoretical ones. Having had very nice chats with their presenters I already learned a lot of what I will have to keep in mind when studying diamond. But so far, I have not come across any issues that are impossible to resolve, which is good news :-).

Mar 01

Helium flash: the beginning of a new chapter.

During the past two and a half years, part of being a delocalized physicist has meant for me that I had to work at one end of the country while my girlfriend and son lived at the other. Today this situation drastically changed, as I moved with my FWO-postdoctoral project from my alma mater to the University of Hasselt, where I started in the Wide Band Gap Materials group of Prof. Ken Haenen.

My delocalization will now take the form of Metal-Organic Frameworks on the one side and Diamond based materials on the other. As the sole computational solid state physicist in an otherwise entirely experimental group (and even institute) I seem to have returned to a well known configuration (At Ghent university I was initially the house-theoretician of the SCRiPTS group). Also the idea of performing calculations on diamond brings back memories, since this allotrope of carbon lives two levels above the germanium on which Pt nanowires grow. All-in-all I look forward to an exciting time. But first things first: getting my HPC credentials and data safely transported from the one end of the country to the other.