Category: publications

Cover Nature Reviews Physics

Authors: Emanuele Bosoni, Louis Beal, Marnik Bercx, Peter Blaha, Stefan Blügel, Jens Bröder, Martin Callsen, Stefaan Cottenier, Augustin Degomme, Vladimir Dikan, Kristjan Eimre, Espen Flage-Larsen, Marco Fornari, Alberto Garcia, Luigi Genovese, Matteo Giantomassi, Sebastiaan P. Huber, Henning Janssen, Georg Kastlunger, Matthias Krack, Georg Kresse, Thomas D. Kühne, Kurt Lejaeghere, Georg K. H. Madsen, Martijn Marsman, Nicola Marzari, Gregor Michalicek, Hossein Mirhosseini, Tiziano M. A. Müller, Guido Petretto, Chris J. Pickard, Samuel Poncé, Gian-Marco Rignanese, Oleg Rubel, Thomas Ruh, Michael Sluydts, Danny E.P. Vanpoucke, Sudarshan Vijay, Michael Wolloch, Daniel Wortmann, Aliaksandr V. Yakutovich, Jusong Yu, Austin Zadoks, Bonan Zhu, and Giovanni Pizzi
Journal: Nature Reviews Physics 6(1), (2024)
doi: web only
IF(2021): 36.273
export: NA
pdf: <NatRevPhys>

Abstract

The cover of this issue shows an artistic representation of the equations of state of the periodic table elements, calculated using two all-electron codes in each of the 10 crystal structure configurations shown on the table. The cover image is based on the Perspective Article How to verify the precision of density-functional-theory implementations via reproducible and universal workflows by E. Bosoni et al., https://doi.org/10.1038/s42254-023-00655-3.  (The related paper can be found here.)

Cover Nature Reviews Physics: Accuracy of DFT modeling in solids

 

How to verify the precision of density-functional-theory implementations via reproducible and universal workflows

Authors: Emanuele Bosoni, Louis Beal, Marnik Bercx, Peter Blaha, Stefan Blügel, Jens Bröder, Martin Callsen, Stefaan Cottenier, Augustin Degomme, Vladimir Dikan, Kristjan Eimre, Espen Flage-Larsen, Marco Fornari, Alberto Garcia, Luigi Genovese, Matteo Giantomassi, Sebastiaan P. Huber, Henning Janssen, Georg Kastlunger, Matthias Krack, Georg Kresse, Thomas D. Kühne, Kurt Lejaeghere, Georg K. H. Madsen, Martijn Marsman, Nicola Marzari, Gregor Michalicek, Hossein Mirhosseini, Tiziano M. A. Müller, Guido Petretto, Chris J. Pickard, Samuel Poncé, Gian-Marco Rignanese, Oleg Rubel, Thomas Ruh, Michael Sluydts, Danny E.P. Vanpoucke, Sudarshan Vijay, Michael Wolloch, Daniel Wortmann, Aliaksandr V. Yakutovich, Jusong Yu, Austin Zadoks, Bonan Zhu, and Giovanni Pizzi
Journal: Nature Reviews Physics 6(1), 45-58 (2024)
doi: 10.1038/s42254-023-00655-3
IF(2021): 36.273
export: bibtex
pdf: <NatRevPhys>
<ArXiv:2305.17274>

 

“We hope our dataset will be a reference for the field for years to come,” says Giovanni Pizzi, leader of the Materials Software and Data Group at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, who led the study. (Image: Paul Scherrer Insitute / Giovanni Pizzi)
Graphical Abstract: “We hope our dataset will be a reference for the field for years to come,” says Giovanni Pizzi, leader of the Materials Software and Data Group at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, who led the study. (Image: Paul Scherrer Insitute / Giovanni Pizzi)

Abstract

Density-functional theory methods and codes adopting periodic boundary conditions are extensively used in condensed matter physics and materials science research. In 2016, their precision (how well properties computed with different codes agree among each other) was systematically assessed on elemental crystals: a first crucial step to evaluate the reliability of such computations. In this Expert Recommendation, we discuss recommendations for verification studies aiming at further testing precision and transferability of density-functional-theory computational approaches and codes. We illustrate such recommendations using a greatly expanded protocol covering the whole periodic table from Z = 1 to 96 and characterizing 10 prototypical cubic compounds for each element: four unaries and six oxides, spanning a wide range of coordination numbers and oxidation states. The primary outcome is a reference dataset of 960 equations of state cross-checked between two all-electron codes, then used to verify and improve nine pseudopotential-based approaches. Finally, we discuss the extent to which the current results for total energies can be reused for different goals.

Hydration sphere structure of architectural molecules: polyethylene glycol and polyoxymethylene oligomers

Authors: Ahmed M. Rozza, Danny E. P. Vanpoucke, Eva-Maria Krammer, Julie Bouckaert, Ralf Blossey, Marc F. Lensink, Mary Jo Ondrechen, Imre Bakó, Julianna Oláh, and Goedele Roos
Journal: Journal of Molecular Liquids 384, 122172 (2023)
doi: 10.1016/j.molliq.2023.122172
IF(2021): 6.633
export: bibtex
pdf: <JMolLiq>

 

Graphical Abstract: PEG or POM, similar in structure though very different in their solvation. Is this due to structure or charge(distribution)?

Abstract

Non-toxic, chemically inert, organic polymers as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyoxymethylene (POM) have versatile applications in basic research, industry and pharmacy. In this work, we aim to characterize the hydration structure of PEG and POM oligomers by exploring how the solute disturbs the water structure compared to the bulk solvent and how the solute chain interacts with the solvent. We explore the effect of (i) the C-C-O (PEG) versus CO (POM) constitution of the chain and (ii) chain length. To this end, MD simulations followed by clustering and topological analysis of the hydration network, as well as by quantum
mechanical calculations of atomic charges are used. We show that the hydration varies with chain conformation and length. The degree of folding of the chain impacts its degree of solvation, which is measurable by different parameters as for example the number of water molecules in the first solvation shell and the solvent accessible surface. Atomic charges calculated on the oligomers in gas phase are stable throughout conformation and chain length and seem not to determine solvation. Hydration however induces charge transfer from the solute molecule to the solvent, which depends on the degree of hydration.

 

Cover image Polymer International: A machine learning approach for the design of hyperbranched polymeric dispersing agents based on aliphatic polyesters for radiation curable inks

Authors: Danny E.P. Vanpoucke, Marie A.F. Delgove, Jules Stouten, Jurrie Noordijk, Nils De Vos, Kamiel Matthysen, Geert G.P. Deroover, Siamak Mehrkanoon, and Katrien V. Bernaerts
Journal: Polymer International 71(8), i-i (2022)
doi: 10.1002/pi.6434
IF(2015): 3.213
export: bibtex
pdf: <PolymerInt>

Abstract

The cover image is based on the Research Article A machine learning approach for the design of hyperbranched polymeric dispersing agents based on aliphatic polyesters for radiation-curable inks by Danny E.P. Vanpoucke et al., https://doi.org/10.1002/pi.6378.  (The related paper can be found here.)

 

Cover Polymer International: Machine learning on small data sets, application on UV curable inks.

Cover Polymer International: Machine learning on small data sets, application on UV curable inks.

 

A machine learning approach for the design of hyperbranched polymeric dispersing agents based on aliphatic polyesters for radiation curable inks

Authors: Danny E.P. Vanpoucke, Marie A.F. Delgove, Jules Stouten, Jurrie Noordijk, Nils De Vos, Kamiel Matthysen, Geert G.P. Deroover, Siamak Mehrkanoon, and Katrien V. Bernaerts
Journal: Polymer International 71(8), 966-975 (2022)
doi: 10.1002/pi.6378
IF(2021): 3.213
export: bibtex
pdf: <PI> (Open Access) (Cover Paper)

 

An ensemble based machine learning model for small datasets was used to predict the relationship between the dispersant structure and the pigment dispersion quality (particle size) for radiation curable formulations.
Graphical Abstract:An ensemble based machine learning model for small datasets was used to predict the relationship between the dispersant structure and the pigment dispersion quality (particle size) for radiation curable formulations.

Abstract

Polymeric dispersing agents were prepared from aliphatic polyesters consisting of δ-undecalactone (UDL) and β,δ-trimethyl-ε-caprolactones (TMCL) as biobased monomers, which are polymerized in bulk via organocatalysts. Graft copolymers were obtained by coupling of the polyesters to poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) in the bulk without using solvents. Different parameters that influence the performance of the dispersing agents in pigment based UV-curable matrices were investigated: chemistry of the polyester (UDL or TMCL), weight ratio of polyester/PEI, molecular weight of the polyesters and of PEI. The performance of the dispersing agents was modelled using machine learning in order to increase the efficiency of the dispersant design. The resulting models were presented as analytical models for the individual polyesters and the synthesis conditions for optimal performing dispersing agents were indicated as a preference for high molecular weight polyesters and a polyester dependent maximum weight ratio polyester/PEI.

Animation of TMCL model 6

Animation of TMCL model 6

 

Localized vibrational modes of GeV-centers in diamond: Photoluminescence and first-principles phonon study

Authors: Kirill N. Boldyrev, Vadim S. Sedov, Danny E.P. Vanpoucke, Victor G. Ralchenko, & Boris N. Mavrin
Journal: Diam. Relat. Mater 126, 109049 (2022)
doi: 10.1016/j.diamond.2022.109049
IF(2020): 3.315
export: bibtex
pdf: <DRM>

 

GeV split vacancy defect in diamond and the phonon modes near the ZPL.
Graphical Abstract: GeV split vacancy defect in diamond and the phonon modes near the ZPL.

Abstract

The vibrational behaviour of the germanium-vacancy (GeV) in diamond is studied through its photoluminescence spectrum and first-principles modeled partial phonon density of states. The former is measured in a region below 600 cm−1. The latter is calculated for the GeV center in its neutral, charged, and excited state. The photoluminescence spectrum presents a previously unobserved feature at 248 cm−1 in addition to the well-known peak at 365 cm−1. In our calculations, two localized modes, associated with the GeV center and six nearest carbon atoms (GeC6 cluster) are identified. These correspond to one vibration of the Ge ion along with the [111] orientation of the crystal and one perpendicular to this direction. We propose these modes to be assigned to the two features observed in the photoluminescence spectrum. The dependence of the energies of the localized modes on the GeV-center and their manifestation in experimental optical spectra is discussed.

On the influence of water on THz vibrational spectral features of molecular crystals

Authors: Sergey Mitryukovskiy, Danny E. P. Vanpoucke, Yue Bai, Théo Hannotte, Mélanie Lavancier, Djamila Hourlier, Goedele Roos and Romain Peretti
Journal: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 24, 6107-6125 (2022)
doi: 10.1039/D1CP03261E
IF(2020): 3.676
export: bibtex
pdf: <PCCP>

 

Graphical Abstract: Comparison of the measured THz spectrum of 3 phases of Lactose-Monohydrate to the calculated spectra for several Lactose configurations with varying water content.

Abstract

The nanoscale structure of molecular assemblies plays a major role in many (µ)-biological mechanisms. Molecular crystals are one of the most simple of these assemblies and are widely used in a variety of applications from pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals, to nutraceuticals and cosmetics. The collective vibrations in such molecular crystals can be probed using terahertz spectroscopy, providing unique characteristic spectral fingerprints. However, the association of the spectral features to the crystal conformation, crystal phase and its environment is a difficult task. We present a combined computational-experimental study on the incorporation of water in lactose molecular crystals, and show how simulations can be used to associate spectral features in the THz region to crystal conformations and phases. Using periodic DFT simulations of lactose molecular crystals, the role of water in the observed lactose THz spectrum is clarified, presenting both direct and indirect contributions. A specific experimental setup is built to allow the controlled heating and corresponding dehydration of the sample, providing the monitoring of the crystal phase transformation dynamics. Besides the observation that lactose phases and phase transformation appear to be more complex than previously thought – including several crystal forms in a single phase and a non-negligible water content in the so-called anhydrous phase – we draw two main conclusions from this study. Firstly, THz modes are spread over more than one molecule and require periodic computation rather than a gas-phase one. Secondly, hydration water does not only play a perturbative role but also participates in the facilitation of the THz vibrations.

The 0.5THz finger-print mode of alpha-Lactose Monohydrate.

The 0.5 THz finger-print mode of alpha-lactose monohydrate.

Deep Eutectic Solvents as Non-flammable Electrolytes for Durable Sodium-ion Batteries

Authors: Dries De Sloovere, Danny E. P. Vanpoucke, Andreas Paulus, Bjorn Joos, Lavinia Calvi, Thomas Vranken, Gunter Reekmans, Peter Adriaensens, Nicolas Eshraghi, Abdelfattah Mahmoud, Frédéric Boschini, Mohammadhosein Safari, Marlies K. Van Bael, An Hardy
Journal: Advanced Energy and Sustainability Research 3(3), 2100159 (2022)
doi: 10.1002/aesr.202100159
IF(2022): ??
export: bibtex
pdf: <AdvEnSusRes> (OA)

 

Graphical Abstract: Understanding the electronic structure of Na-TFSI interacting with NMA.

Abstract

Sodium-ion batteries are alternatives for lithium-ion batteries in applications where cost-effectiveness is of primary concern, such as stationary energy storage. The stability of sodium-ion batteries is limited by the current generation of electrolytes, particularly at higher temperatures. Therefore, the search for an electrolyte which is stable at these temperatures is of utmost importance. Here, we introduce such an electrolyte using non-flammable deep eutectic solvents, consisting of sodium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (NaTFSI) dissolved in N-methyl acetamide (NMA). Increasing the NaTFSI concentration replaces NMA-NMA hydrogen bonds with strong ionic interactions between NMA, Na+, and TFSI. These interactions lower NMA’s HOMO energy level compared to that of TFSI, leading to an increased anodic stability (up to ~4.65 V vs Na+/Na). (Na3V2(PO4)2F3/CNT)/(Na2+xTi4O9/C) full cells show 74.8% capacity retention after 1000 cycles at 1 C and 55 °C, and 97.0% capacity retention after 250 cycles at 0.2 C and 55 °C. This is considerably higher than for (Na3V2(PO4)2F3/CNT)/(Na2+xTi4O9/C) full cells containing a conventional electrolyte. According to the electrochemical impedance analysis, the improved electrochemical stability is linked to the formation of more robust surface films at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The improved durability and safety highlight that deep eutectic solvents can be viable electrolyte alternatives for sodium-ion batteries.

Assigning probabilities to non-Lipschitz mechanical systems

Authors:  Danny E. P. Vanpoucke and Sylvia Wenmackers
Journal: Chaos 31, 123131 (2021)
doi: 10.1063/5.0063388
IF(2021): 3.642
export: bibtex
pdf: <Chaos>   (Open Access) <ArXiv v1>
github: <NortonDomeExplorer>

 

Malament's Mounds
Graphical Abstract: Examples of Malament’s Mounds, of which the Norton Dome is the special case where α=½.

Abstract

We present a method for assigning probabilities to the solutions of initial value problems that have a Lipschitz singularity. To illustrate the method, we focus on the following toy-example: \ddot{r} = r^{a}, r(t = 0) = 0, and \dot{r}|_{r(t=0)}= 0, with a∈]0; 1[. This example has a physical interpretation as a mass in a uniform gravitational field on a dome of particular shape; the case with a = ½ is known as Norton’s dome. Our approach is based on (1) finite difference equations, which are deterministic; (2) elementary techniques from alpha-theory, a simplified framework for non-standard analysis that allows us to study infinitesimal perturbations; and (3) a uniform prior on the canonical phase space.  Our deterministic, hyperfinite grid model allows us to assign probabilities to the solutions of the This allows us to assign probabilities to the solutions of the initial value problem in the original, indeterministic model.

Phase space vector field for all Malament's mounds

Phase space vector field for all Malament’s mounds

Review of 2020

Happy New Year

2020 will forever be the year of viruses for me and a lot of us. At Maastricht University, the year started with a university wide cyber-attack with ransomware. After the computer-viruses came the human viruses, with COVID-19 shutting down one country after the other, and shutting down education systems as well.

Hopefully 2021 will be better behaved, though we know already some of the hurdles which will make life interesting the coming year. COVID-19 is far from over, and it will take at least a year to vaccinate everyone. Furthermore, as of the first of today, the United Kingdom is no longer a part of the EU, making travel inside Europe a little harder again.

But before we launch into these new and interesting times, lets look back at 2020 one last time, keeping up with  tradition. What have I done during the last year of academic merit.

1. Publications: +6 (and currently a handful in progress)

2. Completed refereeing tasks: +17

  • Applied Physics Letters
  • Journal of Physical Chemistry (2x)
  • Computational Materials Science (2x)
  • Materials Chemistry and Physics
  • Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (5x)
  • Diamond and Related Materials (6x)

3. Conferences & workshops in times of Corona: +3/+1 (Attended & Organised), >+4 internal 

ACOS poster prize 2020

ACOS poster prize 2020

With regard to conferences, 2020 was the year everyone came into contact with the concept of the online conference. Many conferences and events got canceled: such as TEDx@UHasselt (which will return in 2021)

  • ACOS 2020, Online, Oktober 28th, 2020 [poster presentation and video-pitch, 2nd poster prize]
  • RSC Chemical Science Symposium 2020, Online, September 29th-30th, 2020 [iposter presentation]
  • D-NL-HIT project meetings [oral presentations]
    • Virtual Partner Meeting, April 8th, 2020
    • Adhesives Pilot Branch meeting, October 7th, 2020
    • Virtual Partner Meeting, October 15th, 2020
    • UV-Curing Branch meeting, October 22nd, 2020
  • SBDD XXV, Hasselt University, Belgium, March 11th-13th, 2020 [(invited) oral presentation, poster presentation] …On Friday13th Belgium went into it’s first lock-down.
  • Pilot Branch meeting adhesives D-NL-HIT project, Maastricht University, Brighlands campus, February 26th, 2020 [Organised]

4. Science Communication & Social media:   

  • In February 2020, I finally caved and joined Twitter as @DelocalizedD .
  • Added several new repositories to my github account, with the most important ones being:
  • Started a YouTube channel (for the ACOS video pitch)

5. Current size of HIVE:

  • Continued work on a public version of HIVE at github: HIVE 4.x   (26K lines, 9 commands available)
  • 61K lines of program (code: 69 %)
  • ~100 files
  • 49 (command line) options

6. Hive-STM program:

And now, upward and onward, a new year, a fresh start.